DIY: Re-purposed Shutter Door

Today I’m sharing the steps I used to re-purpose a shutter door that couldn’t be used. I was inspired by one of the Amy Howard at Home blog posts where she used her One Step Paint and her Toscana Milk Paint products to make a planter from and old shutter. I happened to have a few shutters left from an interior design project several years ago, and seeing Amy Howard’s blog post made me think there has to be something I can do with the shutter door to re-purpose it and make it functional. I came across a shutter door turned coat rack on Etsy, and that was when the light bulb went off. Since I stock Amy Howard at Home products in my store, I tackled the following project using her chalk based paint and milk paint, but I believe you could try this with a similar chalk paint such as Annie Sloan and Old Fashioned Milk Paint.

Shutter start

The Starting Point

Shutter One Step Spa

One Even Coat of Spa White One Step Paint

Shutter project paint close-up

Application of Toscana Milk Paint over One Step Paint

Shutter toscana complete

Milk Paint is very different in color when it dries.

Shutter rubbed small

Rub through the layers to get a lovely patina.

2016-08-17 15.58.33

Add hardware for hanging

Shutter finished with bag

Put your re-purposed shutter to good use.

DIY: Shutter Door Coat Rack Step by Step

Materials Needed:

  • Shutter Door (remove hinges if attached)
  • Amy Howard at Home® One Step Paint™ (I used Spa White)
  • Amy Howard at Home® Toscana Milk Paint™ (I used Cote D’Azure)
  • Amy Howard at Home® Clear Wax™
  • Paint Brush (2 or clean after each use)
  • Cardboard Palette to offload Clear Wax™
  • 400 Grit Sandpaper
  • Water
  • Stir Stick
  • Disposable Cups
  • Disposable Mixing Spoons
  • Lint Free Cotton Rags
  • Hooks for hanging Coats
  • D-rings for hanging the finished product
  • Drill

DIRECTIONS

*Turn One Step Paint™ cans upside-down, 30 minutes prior to painting. This well help the chalk pigments release from the bottom of the cans. 

  1. Clean shutter using product such as Amy Howard at Home Clean Slate or similar product such as simple green to remove and grease or dust.
  2. Open lid of One Step Paint™ with a can opener, and then thoroughly stir with a stir stick. Depending how well the chalk has settled, you may need to alternate shaking and stirring until the paint is mixed well.
  3. Paint your shutter with One Step Paint in an even layer. The One Step Paint serves as a primer for the Toscana Milk Paint. When selecting your colors, be mindful that the finished project will show the layers of paint you have applied. I wanted a subtle contrast and used Spa White One Step Paint as my base color.
  4. While the One Step Paint is drying on your shutter, mix your Toscana Milk Paint with water in a 1 to 1 ratio. I recommend mixing a small amount of water to form a paste (like you would making a good hot chocolate). Then slowly add the water and mix thoroughly. Amy Howard also recommends putting the water and paint in a sealable container and shaking vigorously, then straining the paint through cheesecloth. Either way, if you get foam or bubbles, you’ll want to strain the paint. The color I used was Cote D’Azure. Perfect for my coastal look.
  5. Brush the Toscana Milk Paint on in layers with about 20 minutes of drying time between coats. You will be surprised in the difference of the look of the wet vs. dry milk paint.
  6. Once your layers are dry, you can begin the process of “antiquing” the finish in many ways. I wanted to keep a bit of brightness in the color. So, I simple used a wet cotton rag and rubbed portions of the shutter, especially the edges, to reveal the One Step Paint below. You can also make the piece show a little more age, by dampening the rag with black tea or Amy Howard’s Antiquing Glaze. You can see her Shutter Project here.
  7. The next step is to seal the piece with wax. Clear wax will keep the color nearly the same, while Light Wax will add a slight patina. For a little more age, you can apply dark wax just to the edges. I went with clear, again to keep the brightness.
  8. You’ll need to drill holes for whatever hooks or knobs you choose to add to your piece. I went with some vintage glass knobs. Then add the hooks/ knobs to your shutter.
  9. Lastly, you’ll need to add some d-rings to the back of your shutter in order to hang it. Be sure to mount properly to your wall, however best suits your situation.
  10. “Enjoy the bragging rights” as Amy Howard at Home says…

I hope you found this post both informative and inspiring. If you decide to take on this project, be sure to let me know how it turned out. If you do this with another brand of chalk paint and milk paint, let me know about that, too.

Have you seen a painted piece and wanted to know how to create the same look yourself? Send me a photo. I’m always interested in new project ideas and would love to know what you’re interested in. I’d love to create the painted finish you’re after and share it on the blog with instructions. So, please let me know.

If you’re going to be in my area, feel free to sign up for this Shutter Workshop. I’d love to see you.

Best,

Shannon

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